Substance

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Luke 8:1-3 
1 And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and shewing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve were with him, 2 And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils, 3 And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod’s steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.

min·is·ter (mn-str)
n. Abbr. Min.
1.
a. One who is authorized to perform religious functions in a Christian church, especially a Protestant church.
b. Roman Catholic Church The superior in certain orders.
2. A high officer of state appointed to head an executive or administrative department of government.
3. An authorized diplomatic representative of a government, usually ranking next below an ambassador.
4. A person serving as an agent for another by carrying out specified orders or functions.
v. min·is·tered, min·is·ter·ing, min·is·ters
v.intr.
1. To attend to the wants and needs of others: Volunteers ministered to the homeless after the flood. See Synonyms at tend2.
2. To perform the functions of a cleric.
v.tr.
To administer or dispense (a sacrament, for example).
[Middle English, from Old French ministre, from Latin minister, servant; see mei-2 in Indo-European roots.]
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
minister (ˈmɪnɪstə)
n
1. (Protestantism) (esp in Presbyterian and some Nonconformist Churches) a member of the clergy
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person appointed to head a government department
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any diplomatic agent accredited to a foreign government or head of state
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) short for minister plenipotentiary or envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary. See envoy11
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a diplomat ranking after an envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiaryAlso called (in full): minister resident
6. a person who attends to the needs of others, esp in religious matters
7. a person who acts as the agent or servant of a person or thing
vb
8. (often foll by: to) to attend to the needs (of); take care (of)
9. (tr) to provide; supply
[C13: via Old French from Latin: servant; related to minus less]
ˈministerˌship n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003
min•is•ter (ˈmɪn ə stər)

n.
1. a person authorized to conduct religious worship; member of the clergy; pastor.
2. a person authorized to administer sacraments, as at mass.
3. a person appointed to some high office of state, esp. to that of head of an administrative department.
4. a diplomatic representative, usu. ranking below an ambassador.
5. a person acting as the agent or instrument of another.
v.i.
6. to perform the functions of a religious minister.
7. to give service, care, or aid: to minister to the hungry.
[1250–1300; (n.) Middle English (< Old French menistre) < Latin minister servant =minis-, variant of minus a lesser amount (see minor) + -ter n. suffix]

 

sub·stance (sbstns)
n.
1.
a. That which has mass and occupies space; matter.
b. A material of a particular kind or constitution.
2.
a. Essential nature; essence.
b. Gist; heart.
3. That which is solid and practical in character, quality, or importance: a plan without substance.
4. Density; body: Air has little substance.
5. Material possessions; goods; wealth: a person of substance.
[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin substantia, from substns, substant-, present participle of substre, to be present : sub-, sub- + stre, to stand; see st- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: substance, burden2, core, gist, pith, purport
These nouns denote the essential import or significance of something spoken or written: the substance of his complaint; the burden of the President’s speech; the core of an article; the gist of her argument; the pith of an essay; the purport of a document.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
substance (ˈsʌbstəns)
n
1. the tangible matter of which a thing consists
2. a specific type of matter, esp a homogeneous material with a definite composition
3. the essence, meaning, etc, of a written or spoken thought
4. solid or meaningful quality
5. (General Physics) material density: a vacuum has no substance.
6. material possessions or wealth: a man of substance.
7. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the supposed immaterial substratum that can receive modifications and in which attributes and accidents inhere
b. a thing considered as a continuing whole that survives the changeability of its properties
8. (Christian Churches, other) Christian Science that which is eternal
9. a euphemistic term for any illegal drug
10. in substance with regard to the salient points
[C13: via Old French from Latin substantia, from substāre, from sub- + stāre to stand]
ˈsubstanceless adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003
sub•stance (ˈsʌb stəns)

n.
1. that of which a thing consists; physical matter or material: form and substance.
2. a kind of matter of definite chemical composition: a metallic substance.
3. the actual matter of a thing, as opposed to the appearance or shadow; reality.
4. substantial or solid character or quality: claims lacking in substance.
5. consistency; body.
6. the meaning or gist, as of speech or writing.
7. possessions, means, or wealth.
8. controlled substance.
9. Philos. that which exists by itself and in which accidents or attributes inhere.
Idioms:
in substance,
a. concerning the essentials; substantially.
b. actually; really.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin substantia=sub- sub- + stant-, s. of stāns, present participle of stāre to stand + -ia -ia (see -ance); calque of Greek hypóstasis]
syn: See matter.
Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

substance
noun
1. material, body, stuff, element, fabric, texture The substance that causes the problem comes from the barley.
2. importance, significance, moment, meaningfulness, concreteness It is questionable whether anything of substance has been achieved.
3. meaning, main point, gist, matter, subject, theme, import, significance, essence, pith, burden, sum and substance, gravamen (Law) The substance of his discussions doesn’t really matter.
4. truth, fact, reality, certainty, validity, authenticity, verity, verisimilitude There is no substance in any of these allegations.
5. wealth, means, property, assets, resources, estate, affluence mature men of substance
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

Mary Magdalene’s substance was Love  ~  Belovedness  ~  She ministered unto Him of her substance ~ of her Love.

Luke 8:1-3
1 And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and shewing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve were with him, 2 And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils, 3 And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod’s steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.

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About mags

Beloved apostle of His Soul x
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